2021 MLB Draft

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val
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by val »

The last time I read a mock draft, there were four SSs in the first 8 picks That's too much pressure to pressure to not blow the SS pick, and potentially devastating of we'd picked the one of the four who never made it.

For most of the season I've wanted Rocker (just love the name), but I'm happy with the beat catcher in the draft.
Dan_Stonerook
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by Dan_Stonerook »

Rocker goes #10 to the Mets.
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#9#
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by #9# »

Rellimie wrote: Sun Jul 11, 2021 11:30 pm
#9# wrote: Sun Jul 11, 2021 11:24 pm So...since Davis is a college Senior, the Bucs may be able to save some off slot .... may allow them to take a chance on a prospect with signability issues later.
He's not a senior, he is listed as a 3rd year sophomore.
My bad. I thought that I’d read that he was a 4 year college guy.
Culli
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by Culli »

I liked the Davis pick from the moment it was announced. Choosing a top tier catcher fits multiple needs for this rebuilding team with a dearth of catching down the pipeline.

His stats have been college-solid in the past couple of seasons at Louisville. Davis interviewed well, and seems to have a maturing brain with the ability to realize he has more to learn and a willingness to be taught. His rep as a "leader" on the field can only help, as I expect we'll see a slew of young, inexperienced (and untalented) pitchers try like hell to make the team. What I'd need to research is who will "coach" Davis as he tried to improve his own catching skills.

If someone like Leiter turns out to be excellent and arrives soon, it could still only mean 1 win every 5 games for a lousy ML club. The Bucs went outside the box with this pick, and I think, at this time, it showed forethought for 3 Pirate weaknesses - catching dearth, offense, and leadership.
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bucco boy
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by bucco boy »

I don't think it was outside the box. Davis was consensus top 5 and Keith Law had him No. 1. Again, think Buster Posey. We could only hope he is that good.
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statscbl
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by statscbl »

I hope we keep Stallings. Stallings has over-achieved expectations because he works so hard, understands the game, and he has a good relationship with players. I also think Stallings is smart enough to know this. I think he would embrace sharing the catching duties with Henry Davis.
Rellimie
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by Rellimie »

Best available players on Day 2 (from ESPN):

1. (No. 9 overall). Will Taylor, CF, Dutch Fork HS (South Carolina) (Clemson commit) - Taylor is an elite multisport athlete. He's a state champ as a quarterback and wrestler, and committed to Clemson to play QB, slot receiver and center field. A 70 runner with 55 raw power and a strong track record of hitting is a pretty ridiculous résumé.

2. (No. 23. overall) Bubba Chandler, RHP/SS, North Oconee HS (Georgia) (Clemson commit) - Is committed to be a pitcher, shortstop and quarterback at Clemson but is expected to turn pro. Some teams see him best as a switch-hitting infielder with plus power potential; others see a potential midrotation starter who has been up to 97 mph.

3. (No. 28 overall). Jud Fabian, CF, Florida - He has 65-grade raw power and fits in center field, but started the year with a historic rate of whiffs that has scared off a number of teams.

4. (No. 30 overall). Tyler Whitaker, RF, Bishop Gorman HS (Nevada) (Arizona commit) - Whitaker is 6-foot-5 with easy plus raw and hit a number of tape-measure shots this spring, but his lever length makes you wonder how much contact he'll make at higher levels.

5. (No. 32. overall) Connor Norby, 2B, East Carolina - One of the strongest hit tools in the college class, but has average-ish power, a shorter mid-major track record and is limited to second base. Numbers-approach teams like him the most.

6. (No. 35. overall) Anthony Solometo, LHP, Bishop Eustace Prep HS (New Jersey) (North Carolina commit) - Big lefty competes and has been as high as 98 mph from a funky, long arm action, pitches with more 55-grade stuff.

7. (No. 39 overall). Lonnie White Jr., CF, Malvern Prep HS (Pennsylvania) (Penn State commit) - A Penn State football commit as a wide receiver, White has plus power and has had a strong summer -- but this spring some scouts have wondered about his contact ability and whether he fits better in right field.

8. (No. 40 overall). Adrian Del Castillo, C, Miami - Del Castillo had a rough spring and is a fringy defensive catcher, but the track record is there for a shot at a 55 bat, 50 power and acceptable catcher defense in the robo-ump future.

9. (No. 41 overall) Peyton Wilson, 2B, Alabama - Wilson is a plus-plus runner with a plus arm and has a decent shot to convert to catcher. Productive spring and has bat control, but fringy power and swings too much.

10. (No. 43 overall). Wes Kath, 3B, Desert Mountain HS (Arizona) (Arizona State commit) - Easy lefty swing with easy plus raw power and a loud spring with lots of homers, but bat speed and defensive projection are more ordinary.
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bucco boy
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by bucco boy »

Different source

https://www.cbssports.com/mlb/news/2021 ... schoolers/

OF Will Taylor, Dutch Fork HS (SC)
No. 12 in pre-draft ranking: Taylor, who has a commitment to play both baseball and football at Clemson, is a twitchy athlete with a swing that's tailored for average as well as a strong arm and plus-plus speed. If he chooses baseball, it's easy to envision him outperforming his draft slot in due time.


LHP Anthony Solometo, Bishop Eustace Prep (NJ)
No. 23 in pre-draft ranking: Solometo has the most distinct delivery in the class. At the peak of his leg lift, his knee is up around his clavicle, while his hands are over his head; he then swings his arm back and out in Bumgarnerian fashion before delivering from a low-three-quarters slot. (His arm action is longer than most Guided By Voices songs, is what we're saying.) As for what matters, Solometo is a polished strike-throwing lefty with a fastball that can touch the mid-90s and a good slider.


SS/RHP Spencer Schwellenbach, Nebraska
No. 24 in pre-draft ranking: The name that surfaces most frequently as a comparison for Schwellenbach is Jake Cronenworth; it's sensible, if lazy, as both were two-way players who attended Big Ten schools (Cronenworth went to Michigan) and who have long surnames. Schwellenbach is unlikely to develop into the next Cronenworth, but he has promise on both sides of the ball. He hit .284/.403/.459 with six home runs and nine stolen bases while manning shortstop for the Cornhuskers this season; he also struck out 34 batters in 31 innings as a reliever. His ball-tracking data indicates he hit the ball hard, and that his mid-90s fastball, sweeping slider, and changeup each have potential. It's anyone's guess as to whether his pro team will allow him to play both ways; if not, there's a case to be made for him either hitting or pitching.

SS Peyton Stovall, Haughton HS (LA)
No. 28 in pre-draft ranking: Haughton High School's most famous alum is Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott. Stovall is unlikely to achieve that level of notoriety, but he should soon become the Buccaneers' most notable baseball product. The selling point here is his stick. He's a lefty batter with an aesthetically pleasing swing who scouts are sweet on -- to the extent that they project him to have a plus (or better) hit tool and above-average power production. Those traits make it easier to swallow his defensive shortcomings; namely, his below-average arm all but ensures he's going to end up on the other side of second base. Stovall may have a commitment to Arkansas (the same college Cowboys owner Jerry Jones attended, fittingly enough), but it seems unlikely he honors it.

RHP Bubba Chandler, North Oconee HS (FL)
No. 30 in pre-draft ranking: Chandler is the most prominent of several two-way players in this class. He's also a multi-sport athlete who has an outstanding commitment to play quarterback at Clemson, meaning he could slip down the board if teams feel his price tag is exorbitant. Chandler is, unsurprisingly, raw on both sides of the ball. Provided he does sign, evaluators seem to prefer him on the mound, where he has a promising fastball but needs to work on everything else.

2B Connor Norby, East Carolina
No. 32 in pre-draft ranking: Were it not for 31 at-bats as a freshman, Norby would've finished his Pirates career with a .412 batting average. This season alone, he recorded nearly twice as many games in which he had three or more hits (13) as he did games in which he had zero (seven). He also launched 15 of his 17 career home runs, and nabbed 18 of his 24 career stolen bases. Norby can hit, and he's going to have to because he might not have another above-average tool in his box.

C Adrian Del Castillo, Miami
No. 35 in pre-draft ranking: Del Castillo was a polarizing prospect entering the year, and his underwhelming performance (.275/.380/.395 with three home runs) didn't win over critics. The book on him remains that he's a natural hitter with untapped power potential who may have to move from behind the plate because of his receiving and a weak arm that isn't aided by an elongated throwing motion. Should that scenario come to fruition, he'll likely end up as a first baseman or, at best, as a range-challenged left fielder. A switch to either position would necessitate that he hit for more power, which means the team that picked him would be hoping he turns into the inverse of who he was when they made the selection. Maybe it works out -- Del Castillo's intelligence is held in high regard and there are countless recent examples of contact-first hitters learning to master their juice; the path of least resistance, though, has Del Castillo deemed competent enough to catch during the automated ball-strike era, permitting him the leeway to remain who he is as a hitter.


OF Ethan Wilson, South Alabama
No. 36 in pre-draft ranking: South Alabama has a history of churning out pro players, including five-time All-Star Luis Gonzalez, speedster Juan Pierre, World Series hero David Freese, and Adam Lind. If Wilson is to become the next Jaguar to reach the majors, he's going to have to do it on the strength of his bat. He has plus power potential and he eased some concerns about his swing's rigidity this spring by slicing his strikeout rate from 26 percent to eight percent. Wilson isn't a good runner and he doesn't have a strong arm, meaning he's going to be stuck in left.

LHP Gage Jump, JSerra Catholic HS (CA)
No. 38 in pre-draft ranking: Back in the springtime, a veteran scout predicted Jump would become a top-10 pick, just not in this year's draft. Their reasoning was straightforward. Jump is an undersized (he's listed at 5-foot-11) prep left-hander who could ease concerns about his perceived riskiness (derived from his durability, short arm stroke, and lagging changeup) with a few strong years on campus. Whether or not he ends up at UCLA is to be seen, and likely hinges on where he's taken. For now, though, Jump has a promising fastball that can touch the mid-90s, a good breaking ball, and a slow-to-fast delivery that adds deception.

OF Lonnie White Jr., Malven Prep (PA)
No. 39 in pre-draft ranking: Ranking any prospect is more of an art than a science, but it becomes a pure guessing game when two-sport stars with commitments to prominent universities are involved. White is slated to play baseball and football for Penn State, and it's to be seen whether teams think he can be convinced to turn professional instead. He runs well, he throws well, and his bat has above-average promise thanks to a simple swing and his quick hands. There are wide error bars here to be cognizant of, since scouts haven't seen him focus exclusively on baseball for long periods of time. With any luck, White will have ample reason to change that later this summer.


OF Jud Fabian, Florida
No. 41 in pre-draft ranking: Fabian entered the season ranked as the third-best prospect in the class. He had an impressive track record against SEC competition; he was young for a college junior; and scouts foresaw him having plus power. Then Fabian, a wrong-way guy (he bats right, throws left), went … well, the wrong way. He punched out in 29.4 percent of his regular season plate appearances, including 36 percent of those he took in February and March. He made several mechanical tweaks thereafter, and he went on to strike out at a more modest clip (24.7 percent) the rest of the way.

RHP Jaden Hill, LSU
No. 42 in pre-draft ranking: Here's the first couple of sentences from Hill's write-up when CBS Sports ranked him as the ninth-best draft prospect in February: "This is certain to look like a misrank by draft day. The question is whether Hill moves up or down boards by then, with the answer hinging on his availability." Unfortunately, Hill was limited to just seven starts before undergoing Tommy John surgery in April. He has the foundational traits of being an above-average big-league starter: a three-pitch mix (including a changeup that he kills the spin on); primo physicality; and well-regarded makeup. Some teams, though, are going to have reservations about his durability after his body (and the pandemic) restricted him to 51 innings over his three years with the Tigers.

LHP Ky Bush, St. Mary's
No. 43 in pre-draft ranking: The Gaels have developed a couple notable big-league starters in recent years, in Corbin Burnes and Tony Gonsolin. Bush, a 6-foot-5 southpaw who transferred twice before finding a home, could be next. He has a full arsenal of pitches, including a good fastball-slider combination, a progressing changeup, and a curveball. Bush's command uptick (he walked just 5.9 percent of the batters he faced) has been credited to improved conditioning. Provided he keeps his work boots on, he should be able to overcome a limited track record (117 collegiate innings) to provide good value for his future employer.


RHP Dylan Smith, Alabama
No. 44 in pre-draft ranking: Smith has come a long way in a short time. When he arrived at Alabama, his delivery included a giant leg kick; he's since simplified his mechanics, with his best collegiate season coming this year. Smith, who was limited to 22 relief innings in his freshman and sophomore seasons, posted a 3.84 ERA and a 5.65 strikeout-to-walk ratio while leading the Crimson Tide in innings pitched. He doesn't have loud stuff, the way some of his SEC counterparts on this list do, but he does have a broad arsenal and it's possible he could take another step forward if he lands with the right player development staff.

RHP Ben Kudrna, Blue Valley Southwest HS (KS)
No. 45 in pre-draft ranking: Kudrna, an LSU commit, is a projectable right-hander with a clean delivery and the makings of a quality three-pitch mix. His fastball can touch into the mid-90s and he complements it with a good slider and a developing changeup. Kudrna has also shown a feel for altering the tempo of his delivery, à la Johnny Cueto and Marcus Stroman, in order to disrupt the hitter's timing. (That doesn't move the needle on his evaluation, but it's appreciated all the same.)

SS Wes Kath, Desert Mountain HS (AZ)
No. 46 in pre-draft ranking: Kath is a physical left-handed hitter with quiet hands and well-above-average raw power. He has left-side arm strength defensively, but he's unlikely to remain at shortstop because of his subpar quickness; instead, he should take up residency at third base. Should Kath ever desire to strike up a conversation with Brooks Conrad (everyone could use another friend), the two probably won't be able to bond over their experiences at Arizona State. No worries, though, as they have something else in common: a distaste for batting gloves.


SS Edwin Arroyo, Central Pointe Christian Academy (FL)
No. 49 in pre-draft ranking: Arroyo, who has a commitment to Florida State, is one of the best defenders in the class. He has all the weaponry to become a long-term asset at the six: soft hands, a strong arm, short-area quickness. What he doesn't have for the time being is a good stick. Arroyo, a switch-hitter, needs to improve his approach and make contact more frequently to take advantage of his bat speed and loft. A team who prioritizes young premium defenders (he won't turn 18 until several months after the draft) can take him early and then put him on the scenic route to the majors in the name of nurturing his bat to its full potential.
Last edited by bucco boy on Mon Jul 12, 2021 5:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Dan_Stonerook
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by Dan_Stonerook »

Pirates pick LHP Anthony Solometo 6'5" lefty.
statscbl
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by statscbl »

Pirates second round pick

Anthony Solometo
Scouting Grades/Report (20-80 grading scale)
FASTBALL
55
SLIDER
55
CHANGEUP
50
CONTROL
55
OVERALL
50
If you’re a big high school left-hander who has an unusual delivery, chances are you’re going to draw some Madison Bumgarner or MacKenzie Gore comps. Solometo, the New Jersey prepster who threw well over the summer at events like the Area Code Games, has gotten both. And that’s a big reason why he was being carefully watched as the Draft approached, with solid performances in New Jersey raising his stock.

The combination of a 6-foot-3 frame and left-handedness have many scouts feeling very bullish about Solometo’s chances at the next level. With a Gore-like high kick and a Bumgarner-esque three-quarter delivery, the North Carolina recruit throws his fastball in the 90-94 mph range with good power and life. He has outstanding command of the pitch, already showing the ability to challenge right-handed hitters inside with it. His breaking ball is at its best when it’s more of a true slider, and though it can get a little too big at times and become slurvy, it still plays well off of his arm slot. He has an average changeup now, but he has the chance to have three above-average pitches in the future.

The funk in Solometo’s delivery adds a ton of deception, making his already good stuff play up even more. He repeats it well and has a good idea of how to use his stuff. After a firm jump on the map over the summer, the southpaw has really moved up boards this spring, with a chance to land in the first round.
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bucco boy
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

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Dan_Stonerook
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by Dan_Stonerook »

64th Pick is OF Lonnie White Jr.
statscbl
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by statscbl »

Dan_Stonerook wrote: Mon Jul 12, 2021 6:16 pm 64th Pick is OF Lonnie White Jr.
He is an 18 year old high ceiling, low floor type of pick. Scouting report put his running ability at a 70 as he is ready to step in and play center field and/or wide receiver for Penn State. The Pirates may have to pony up a few extra dollars to sign this guy.
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bucco boy
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

Post by bucco boy »

statscbl wrote: Mon Jul 12, 2021 6:22 pm
Dan_Stonerook wrote: Mon Jul 12, 2021 6:16 pm 64th Pick is OF Lonnie White Jr.
He is an 18 year old high ceiling, low floor type of pick. Scouting report put his running ability at a 70 as he is ready to step in and play center field and/or wide receiver for Penn State. The Pirates may have to pony up a few extra dollars to sign this guy.
So him play football last year against our local HS. Was running past our secondary like they weren't there. Guy is an athletic freak. He has a tough decision to make. His slot is $1.05 million. It's kind of a Josh Bell situation.
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Re: 2021 MLB Draft

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